Table of Contents

Decree

Presentation

Historical notes

Contents

Abbreviations

INTRODUCTION

         1.     Need for and thrust of the General Plan of

Formation (GPF)

2.     Nature and aim of the GPF

3.     Addressees of the GPF

4.     Sources of inspiration for the GPF

5.     Structure of the GPF

PART ONE

GENERAL ASPECTS

CHAPTER 1:        Claretian Formation: Objective and Frame of Reference

Introduction

1.     Fundamental objective

1.1. Conformity with Christ the Missionary

1.2. According to the Claretian charism in the Church

1.3. By means of a personalizing process

1.4. In each concrete situation, yet open to our universal mission

2.     Frame of reference

2.1. Our Claretian identity (charismatic reference)

2.1.1.    We are followers of Jesus Christ in the style of the Apostles

2.1.2.    Formed by the Spirit in the forge of Mary’s Heart

2.1.3.    In missionary community

2.1.4.    Called to evangelize through the ministry of the Word

2.1.5.    In the universal mission of the Church

2.1.6.    In keeping with the demands, options

and preferential recipients of our mission

2.2.  Formation as a process (pedagogical reference)

2.2.1.    Personalized

2.2.2.    Integral and integrating

2.2.3.    Gradual, progressive and articulated

2.2.4.    Differentiated

2.2.5.    Liberating and prophetic

2.2.6.    Inculturated and universal

2.3. The present situation (situational reference)

2.3.1.    The sociocultural situation

2.3.2.    The ecclesial situation

2.3.3.    The congregational situation

 

CHAPTER 2:        Becoming Conformed with Christ the Missionary

1.     The experience of vocation as a point of departure

2.     Community as an expression of our shared missionary calling

3.     Mission as a key to formation

4.     The religious vows

4.1. Chastity

4.2. Poverty

4.3. Obedience

5.     Apostolic virtues

5.1. Apostolic charity

5.2. Humility

5.3. Meekness

5.4. Mortification

CHAPTER 3:        Agents and Models of Inspiration

Introduction

1.     Agents

1.1. The Spirit who anoints us for mission

1.2. Mary, forming missionaries in the forge of her Heart

1.3. The formandus, primary agent in his process of formation

1.4. Formators and formation teams

1.5. The formation community

1.6. Other agents

2.     Models of inspiration

2.1. Our Founder

2.1.1. Claret as a charismatic model

2.1.2. The Autobiography as a Claretian itinerary

2.1.3. The “Forge” as a pedagogical proposal

2.1.4. Model Saints

2.2. The Congregation

2.2.1. The exemplary thrust of its history

2.2.2. The Constitutions as an expression of the Congregation’s project of missionary life

 

CHAPTER 4:        Factors in Formation (Personal and Environmental)

Introduction

1.     Personal factors .

1.1. Physical factors

1.2. Psychological factors

1.3. Youth-related factors

2.     Environmental factors

2.1. The family

2.2. Physical space

2.3. Society and culture

2.4. Ecclesial community

2.5. Congregational community

2.6. Provincial community

3.     Local settings

3.1. Social and cultural setting

3.2. The formation house

CHAPTER 5:        Dynamisms and Means

Introduction

1.     Vocational accompaniment

1.1. The process of growth in vocation

1.2. Personal accompaniment

2.     The Word and the Sacraments

2.1. The Word

2.2. The Eucharist

2.3. Reconciliation

3.     Prayer and study

3.1. Prayer

3.2. Study

4.     Community life and formative apostolic experiences

4.1. Community life

4.2. Apostolic experiences in formation

CHAPTER 6:        Agents and Structures of Animation and Coordination

Introduction

1.     The Superiors of the Congregation

2.     Prefectures of Formation

2.1. General aspects

2.2. The Prefecture General of Formation

2.3. Provincial Prefectures of Formation

2.4. Formation Councils

3.     Interprovincial Collaboration

 

 

PART TWO

STAGES

CHAPTER 7:        Stage of Vocation Ministry and Acceptance

1.     Vocation ministry in the Church

2.     Vocation ministry in the Congregation

2.1. Aim

2.2. Levels

2.2.1. Vocation ministry in the broad sense

2.2.2. Vocation ministry to youth

2.2.3. Claretian vocation ministry

2.3. Objectives

2.4. Dynamisms and means of animating vocations

2.5. Environments for vocation ministry

2.6. Those in charge: persons, communities and teams

2.7. The vocational process

2.7.1. Phases of the proces

2.7.2. Those responsible for this process

2.7.3. General criteria of discernment

3.     Welcoming vocations

3.1. General principles

3.2. General objectives

3.3. Specific objectives

3.4. Different forms of welcoming vocations

3.4.1. Charcateristics

3.4.2. Those in charge

3.4.3. The minor seminary

3.4.4. Other forms of welcoming vocations

CHAPTER 8:        Stage of Preparation: Postulancy

1.     Nature and aim

2.     Requirements

3.     General objectives

4.     Specific objectives and means

4.1. Human dimension

4.1.1. Specific objectives

4.1.2. Means

4.2. Christian dimension

4.2.1. Specific objectives

4.2.2. Means

4.3. Claretian dimension

4.3.1. Specific objectives

4.3.2. Means

5.     Characteristics

6.     The person in charge

CHAPTER 9:        Stage of Initiation: Novitiate

1.     Nature and aim

2.     Requirements

3.     General objectives

4.     Specific objectives and means

4.1. Human dimension

4.1.1. Specific objectives

4.1.2. Means

4.2. Christian dimension

4.2.1. Specific objectives

4.2.2. Means

4.3. Claretian dimension

4.3.1. Specific objectives

4.3.2. Means

5.     Characteristics

6.     The Novicemaster and his collaborators

7.     Special moments

CHAPTER 10:      Stage of Development and Consolidation: Missionaries in Formation

1.     Nature and aim

2.     Juridical aspects

3.     General objectives

4.     Specific objectives and means

4.1. Human dimension

4.2. Christian dimension

4.3. Claretian dimension

5.     Characteristics

6.     Principal dynamisms

6.1. Prayer

6.2. Study

6.3. Community life

6.4. Apostolic experiences

6.5. Personal accompaniment

7.     The Prefect and his collaborators

8.     Perpetual profession and preparation for it

CHAPTER 11:      Differentiated Formation

1.     The need for differentiated formation

2.     Particular aspects of the formation of Missionary Brothers

2.1. General Criteria

2.2. Formative guidelines

2.3. Ministries proper of their lay condition

2.3.1. Non-installed ministries

2.3.2. Installed ministries: lector and acolyte

2.4. Organizational aspects

3.     The specific formation of the Missionary Deacon

3.1. General criteria

3.2. Functions of the ministry of deacon

3.3. Formative guidelines

3.4. Admission to the Diaconate

4.     The specific formation of the Missionary Priest

4.1. General criteria

4.2. Functions of priestly ministry

4.3. Formative guidelines

4.4. Admission to the Priesthood

CHAPTER 12:      The Missionary in the Process of Ongoing Formation

1.     Nature and aim of ongoing formation

2.     Need for ongoing formation

2.1. In order to be faithful to our own personal

project of life

2.2. In order to be faithful to the renewing action of the Spirit

2.3. In order to be faithful to the process of congregational renewal

2.4. In order to be faithful to the challenges of mission

3.     Charismatic thrust of ongoing formation

4.     Congregational criteria for ongoing formation

5.     Agents and those in charge of ongoing formation

6.     Ways of doing this

6.1. Ordinary ways

6.1.1. Personal level

6.1.2. Community level

6.1.3. Provincial level

6.1.4. General level

6.2. Extraordinary ways

6.2.1. Specializations

6.2.2. The sabbatical year

6.2.3. Missionary experiences

7.     Particular situations

7.1. The “fifth year”

7.2. The “third age”

 APPENDICES

Appendix 1:       Documents of the Magisterium and of the

Congregation on Formation

Appendix 2:       Systematic Articulation of the Canons of the CIC on Formation for the Religious Life and for Ministries

Appendix 3:       Plans of Studies

Appendix 4:       Documents, Reports and Forms

Appendix 5:       Basic Bibliography for Formation Centers

TOPICAL INDEX

COMPLETE TABLE OF CONTENTS